Assessing Higher Order Thinking in Mathematics

By Gerald Kulm | Go to book overview

Index
Ability, perceived, 139, 143-144
Academic motivation, 139, 143
Accountability, 7, 9-11, 39, 41, 71, 122, 149
Activation, 13, 159
Activity, performance-based, 12
Agenda for Action, 53
Applied mathematics, 2, 102
Assessment
alternative, 29
authentic, 8
calculator-supported, 112
computer-based, 81, 127-130, 161
continuous, 138
format, 76
framework, 24, 73
graded, 35
graduated, 30
multiple criteria for, 23
open-ended, 45
performance, 8, 45
portfolio, 45
schema, 161-164
traditional, 35, 75
Assessment Performance Unit, 4, 33
"Back to basics," 71
Behaviorism, 26-27
Belief systems, 57
Binet intelligence, 137
Bloom's taxonomy, 25-26
Calculator
features, 112
sequence, 112-114
support, 111-112, 167
California Assessment Program, 43
California Mathematics Framework, 40
Chicago Mathematics Program, 112
Classification, 24, 141, 188
Classroom climate, 68
Cognitive science, 9, 27, 85, 94, 121, 155, 159
Cognitive style, 183
Competency, minimal, 71, 77
Computational skills, 2, 72, 111-112, 166
Concepts
change, 92-94
characteristics, 87
development, 94
framework, 92-94
model 83, 92-96, 100
network, 99-100
states, 94
Construct validity, 14, 17, 138, 144
Content-by-behavior, 25, 28, 33, 73
Curriculum
alignment, 11, 39, 42
intended, 39
scope and sequence of, 3, 26
Data, numerical, 169
Decisions, executive, in problem solving, 57
Deep understanding, 13-14, 124, 137
Developmental level, 176, 183
Domain
representation of, 157
specification of, 42, 44
Dual testing, 111
Economic competitiveness, 10
Education
indicators for, 15, 17
mass, 23
reform of, 9, 22
Electronic note card, 98
Evaluation
critical, 169-170
formative, 11
strategies for, 24
Evidential value, 171-173, 178, 181-182
Executive decisions in problem solving, 57
Expert knowledge base, 130
Figurative rules 150-151
Grading system, 69
Graphical arguments, 171-173
Graphs,
data for, 171-174, 177, 181
elements of, 169, 175
Group performance, 9
Guttman true-types, 188
Hierarchies, 1, 24, 27, 73
Holistic interpretation of problems, 95
Industrial revolution, 21

-207-

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