Communist China's Economy, 1949-1962: Structural Changes and Crisis

By Cheng Chu-Yuan | Go to book overview
How much time do the Chinese communists now estimate will be required to complete the process of transition? Earlier, in optimistic statements, the CCP affirmed that the transition from collective ownership to ownership by the people as a whole might require three or four years in some places, and five or six years or even longer in other places [23]. Later, in December, 1958, this estimate was revised and the period of transition was set at twenty or more years. More recently, the Party has proclaimed that the system of ownership by the brigades as the basic unit will exist for a prolonged period, Four basic prerequisites have been set before ownership can be transferred to the commune:
1. The annual income of each commune member should reach 150 to 200 yuan (the equivalent of 60 to 80 U. S. dollars), which is double the current income [24];
2. All the poor brigades should reach the income level of the rich brigades;
3. Agricultural mechanization should progress to a specified goal;
4. The commune-owned economy should be developed fully [25].
Given these conditions, the transition from brigade to communal ownership could require the span of several five-year plans. In September, 1960, Liao Lu-yen, Minister of Agriculture, indicated that, the transition from brigade-ownership to commune- ownership, "will be decided after 1965; it remains to be seen that the conditions will be then" [26]. This statement implies that the transition is to be postponed indefinitely. In reality, it may become an impossibility in the foreseeable future.
REFERENCES
1. Jen-mill Jih-pao (People's Daily), April 18, 1957. Hereafter referred to as JMJP.
2. Documents of the First Session of the First National People's Congress of the People's Republic of China ( Peking: Foreign Languages Press, 1955), p. 41.
3. V. I. Lenin, Complete Works ( Chinese edition), Vol. XXVI, p, 116.
4. Joseph Stalin, The Foundations of Leninism ( New York: International Publishers, 1939), p. 36.
5. Karl Marx and Frederick Engels, Selected Works ( Moscow: Foreign Languages Publishing House, 1955), Vol. I, p. 53.
6. This transitory period is equivalent to the stage of socialism which prevails in every communist country prior to the construction of communism, and is an integral phase of the Marxist-Leninist concept of historical progress although it is not an independent stage.

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Communist China's Economy, 1949-1962: Structural Changes and Crisis
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page i
  • Foreword iii
  • Preface v
  • Contents vii
  • List of Tables ix
  • Other Books by the Same Author xi
  • Abbreviations xii
  • Chapter 1 Introduction 1
  • References 3
  • Chapter 2 Major Features of China's Pre-Communist Economic Structure 4
  • References 9
  • Chapter 3 Chinese Communist Theories and Policies for Economic Structural Transformation 11
  • References 19
  • Chapter 4 Agricultural Collectivizsation 22
  • References 56
  • Chapter 5 Transformation of the Private Sector into the State-Operated Sector 60
  • References 82
  • Chapter 6 Establishment of the Central Planning Machinery and State Monopoly 84
  • References 104
  • Chapter 7 Basic Changes in the Component of the National Product 106
  • Chapter 8 Famine and Crisis 128
  • References 153
  • Chapter 9 Significance and Prospects 157
  • References 172
  • Chapter 10 Conclusion 175
  • Appendix a Note on Communist China's Statistical Data 181
  • References 189
  • Appendix II Conversion Tables 191
  • Selected Bibliography 194
  • Index 208
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