A Handbook for Data Analysis in the Behavioral Sciences: Statistical Issues

By Gideon Keren; Charles Lewis | Go to book overview

6
Set Correlation

Jacob Cohen New York University

By now, it is widely appreciated that multiple regression/correlation analysis (MRC) can be used as a general data-analytic system ( J. Cohen, 1968, 1982a; J. Cohen & P. Cohen, 1983; Pedhazur, 1982). As a realization of the univariate general linear model, it incorporates the analysis of variance (ANOVA) and the analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) as special cases, and is not constrained to the neat balanced layouts or categorical independent variables ("treatments," "diagnosis") that characterizes their textbook presentation. With MRC, one can use graduated ("continuous") independent variables, study interactions and other nonlinear relationships involving such variables, and represent missing data as positive information. Moreover, one can readily generalize the notion of "adjusting" for covariates," used in ANCOVA for categorical independent variables, to graduated variables in "the analysis of partial variance" (APV). MRC also offers the obvious benefit of a common framework for apparently diverse techniques, with a common effect size measure (proportion of variance accounted for), and is replete with least squares parameter estimation, hypothesis testing, and power analysis.

The versatility of MRC as a general data-analytic method is largely due to the use of sets of independent variables representing research factors as the units of analysis, and the varied use of partialling.


SETS AS RESEARCH FACTORS

Virtually any information can be represented by a suitably chosen set of quantitative variables: nominal (qualitative, categorical) scales, curvilinearly related

-165-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
A Handbook for Data Analysis in the Behavioral Sciences: Statistical Issues
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 540

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.