Gallipoli: The Medical War : the Australian Army Medical Services in the Dardanelles Campaign of 1915

By Michael B. Tyquin | Go to book overview

CHAPTER FOUR
Transport of the Wounded

The whole beach is filled with wounded of all kinds and all descriptions of wounds. It has quite unnerved me for a time. Some of the wounds are so ghastly, whole abdomens blown away and the men still living. They are in such numbers that it is difficult to get along, and there is only one hospital ship in the bay.1


INTRODUCTION

Australian medical units at the front managed remarkably well given the circumstances at Gallipoli. However, as such units or their personnel were engaged further afield, that is on hospital ships and transports, they coped less well. This situation continued along the chain of evacuation until Australian base hospitals were reached in Egypt--which were again under the more immediate supervision of Australian, as opposed to Imperial officers. The AAMC therefore worked best when it was in complete control in its own sphere of activity.

What follows is an investigation of the complexities involved in the transport of the wounded all along the Lines of Communication, beginning at the front and finishing at the base hospitals. It also surveys the evacuation work of the various

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Gallipoli: The Medical War : the Australian Army Medical Services in the Dardanelles Campaign of 1915
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Preface and Acknowledgement ix
  • Chapter One - Introduction 1
  • Chapter Two - Gallipoli-- on the Attack 12
  • Chapter Three - Treatment of Sick and Wounded 51
  • Chapter Four - Transport of the Wounded 74
  • Chapter Five - Disease 109
  • Chapter Six - Other Causes of Concern for the Aamc 125
  • Chapter Seven - Politics and Rivalries 162
  • Chapter Eight - Conclusions --Post Mortem 190
  • Appendices 200
  • Bibliography - Unpublished Sources: 230
  • Notes 241
  • Index 264
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