The International Conferences of American States, 1889-1928: A Collection of the Conventions, Recommendations, Resolutions, Reports, and Motions Adopted by the First Six International Conferences of the American States, and Documents Relating to the Organization of the Conferences

By James Brown Scott; Carnegie Endowment for International Peace et al. | Go to book overview

PROTOCOL, CONVENTIONS AND RESOLUTIONS
ADOPTED BY THE CONFERENCE

PROTOCOL
ON ADHERENCE TO THE CONVENTIONS OF THE HAGUE1

WHEREAS: The Delegates to the International Conference of the American States, believing that public sentiment in the Republics represented by them is constantly growing in the direction of heartily favoring the widest application of the principles of arbitration; that the American Republics controlled alike by the principles and responsibilities of popular government and bound together by increasing mutual interests, can, by their own actions, maintain peace in the Continent, and that permanent peace between them will be the forerunner and harbinger of their national development and of the happiness and commercial greatness of their peoples;

They have, therefore, agreed upon the following


PROJECT

ART. 1ST. The American Republics, represented at the International Conference of American States in Mexico, which have not subscribed to the three Conventions signed at The Hague on the 29th. of July, 1899, hereby recognize as a part of Public International American Law the principles set forth therein.

____________________
1
Translation. Second American International Conference, Mexico, 1901-1902. Recommendations, Resolutions, Conventions and Treaties (Mexico, 1902). See also Spanish text of same collection.
The Committee on Arbitration having failed to arrive at an agreement on the matter entrusted to it, a plan was adopted whereby the Protocol on Adherence to the Conventions of The Hague and the Treaty on Compulsory Arbitration, post, p. 100, were signed by the delegations supporting them before their submission to the conference, the former being signed by all the delegations of the conference except Chile and Ecuador, the latter by ten delegations. The two documents were then brought before the conference, and after a protracted debate on a point of order involving the plan adopted for action thereon, Chile and Ecuador accepted a solution which made them parties to the protocol. The two documents were then sent to the Minister of Foreign Relations of Mexico, accompanied with the minutes of the debates, to be officially certified and transmitted by that official to the several signatory governments. An uncertified copy of the protocol was transmitted to the Department of State by the Mexican Government in note of May 23, 1902.
Venezuela's withdrawal from the conference on January 14, 1902, with retroactive effect to and from December 31, 1901, invalidated its adherence to the protocol and treaty.
See resolution of the Third Conference, post, p. 124.

-61-

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