Biographical Dictionary of European Labor Leaders - Vol. 2

By A. Thomas Lane | Go to book overview

N

NADAUD, Martin ( 1815-1890). Born in La Martinèche, Soubrebost (Creuse), France, on 17 November, 1815; in January 1839 he married Mademoiselle Aupetit, with whom he had one daughter; in 1830 accompanied his father who, like the majority of the men in the region, worked as a stonemason in Paris, and for almost three years worked as a laborer before becoming, at the age of 17, a mason in his own right; began very early on to try to organise the workers and became involved in the activities of the Workers' Propaganda Committee of the Society for Human Rights; kept company with the republicans, and with socialist and communist thinkers; while continuing to teach himself, he also gave classes to the other workers, teaching them how to read and count; in February 1831 and June 1832 he participated in the republican uprisings; when he joined the ranks of the insurgents in 1848, he was very much influenced by the ideas of Cabet (q.v.); he did not win a seat on the Constituent Assembly in the elections of 23 April, 1848, but was elected to the Legislative Assembly on 13 May, 1849; in the demonstration of 13 June, 1849, was on the side of the authorities; from 1850 onwards began to notice the effect of Bonapartist propaganda on the workers, and tried to organise them to resist these ideas; on 2 December, 1851 was arrested and on 9 January of the following year was forced into exile, first going to Brussels, then Antwerp, and finally, like so many others, to London; tried at first to take up work as a stonemason there, but, discouraged by the hostility of the English workers, he decided to become a teacher of French, first in Brighton, from 1855 and then, from 1858, at the Wimbledon Military Academy; he also worked on Delescluze's (q.v.) newspaper 'Le Réveid'; returned to France definitively in 1870 and was appointed by Gambetta Prefect of the Creuse département, a post from which he resigned on 6 March, 1871; on 29 November, 1871 was elected a member of the Municipal Council of Paris by the voters of the Pare Lachaise district and took charge of public works and social issues; in 1876 was elected member of parliament; became involved in

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Biographical Dictionary of European Labor Leaders - Vol. 2
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Editorial Board ii
  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Introduction ix
  • M 594
  • N 687
  • O 706
  • P 720
  • Q 783
  • R 786
  • S 830
  • T 943
  • U 986
  • V 992
  • W 1019
  • Y 1048
  • Z 1050
  • Appendix: Labor Leaders by State Or National/Ethnic Group 1067
  • Selective Bibliography 1085
  • Index 1089
  • About the Editor And Contributors 1125
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