A History of Byzantine Music and Hymnography

By Egon Wellesz | Go to book overview

CHAPTER XI
BYZANTINE MUSICAL NOTATION II
THE NEUMES

(I) THE THREE PHASES OF NEUMATIC NOTATION
THREE different kinds of Byzantine musical notation can be clearly distinguished, though all of them develop from the same roots, the prosodic signs:(1) an early stage in which the signs have no distinct interval value; (2) a later, in which the signs give clear indication of the size of the intervals; and (3) a final development, in which subsidiary signs in red ink are added to the musical notation in black ink. J. B. Thibaut, the first scholar to make a systematic investigation of Byzantine musical notation and to try to deduce the origin of Latin neumes from Constantinople,1 gave the following names to the three groups:
1. Notation Constantinopolitaine ( 11th century)
2. Notation Hagiopolite ( 13th century)
3. Notation de Koukouzélès (13th-10th century)
By this division Thibaut intended to emphasize his theory that the first phase originated in Constantinople, the second in Jerusalem, and that the last, according to the view of Neo-Greek theorists, was invented by Koukouzeles. In the same year A. Gastoué Catalogue des manuscrits de musique byzantine ( Paris, 1907) appeared, in which he divided the earliest phase into two groups: (a) Notation Paléobyzantine ( 10th century), and (b) Notation Byzantine mixte Constantinopolitaine ( 11th century). He used the same names for the second and third phases as Thibaut had done.The most comprehensive study on the subject, H. Riemann Die byzantinische Notenschrift ( Leipzig, 1909), was partly based on Fleischer Neumen-Studien, partly on Gastoué Catalogue. Riemann arrived at the following division:
1. Oldest notation (c. A.D. 1000).
2. Transition to (3) (fragment from Chartres, Cod. 1754, 11th- 12th century).
____________________
1
Origine byzantine de la notation neumatique de l'église latine ( Paris, 1907).

-261-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
A History of Byzantine Music and Hymnography
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 474

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.