The Cicero Spy Affair: German Access to British Secrets in World War II

By Richard Wires | Go to book overview

4
Selling the Secrets

During a brief period at the end of October and in the first week of November, lasting patterns in the spy affair took shape. The contacts between the valet and Moyzisch acquired a form they would retain, Schellenberg organized the validation and processing of the information arriving from Cicero, and the eager spy found that Sir Hughe's routine helped him pursue his purpose. In the following weeks the servant continued to perfect his espionage methods, encouraged by the lax security, but there were uncertainties and problems of which he remained unaware. After the conclusion of three film transactions within a span of just seven days. Moyzisch was called to Berlin, where caution and interdepartmental conflicts combined to produce a break in the film purchases. Meanwhile Bazna proceeded with copying British papers. It never occurred to him that the Germans would question the ease and speed with which he worked and think that he might be a planted British agent and his films therefore a ruse. From his standpoint the whole affair seemed to go smoothly from the outset.

★ ★ ★

The place for the initial rendezvous had been chosen well. A remembered hole in the wire fence at the rear of the embassy grounds allowed entry, and bushes concealed the tool shed where they would make contact. Neither man trusted the other, the intelligence officer suspecting a trap or robbery of some kind, the spy perhaps an attack, even an attempt at blackmail to obtain the films without paying. Bazna's sudden appearance from the shadows therefore startled the nervous Moyzisch. When they reached the building where Moyzisch had his office, each wanted to see what the other had; Moyzisch opened his safe to show the money, while the spy displayed the rolls of film. Bazna

-43-

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The Cicero Spy Affair: German Access to British Secrets in World War II
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Preface ix
  • 1 - The "Notorious" Case 1
  • 2 - Turkey and the Powers 13
  • 3 - The Volunteer Spy 29
  • 4 - Selling the Secrets 43
  • 5 - Germany's Intelligence Labyrinth 57
  • 6 - Questions and Doubts In Berlin 69
  • 7 - Operation Bernhard 85
  • 8 - Cicero's Outstanding Period 97
  • 9 - The Contest for Turkey 113
  • 10 - Searching for an Agent 129
  • 11 - Cicero's Last Achievements 143
  • 12 - An American Spy 159
  • 13 - Dénouement and Aftermath 173
  • 14 - The Affair in Retrospect 187
  • Notes 205
  • Filmography 243
  • Selected Bibliography 247
  • Index 259
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