The Cicero Spy Affair: German Access to British Secrets in World War II

By Richard Wires | Go to book overview

Notes

REFERENCES AND ABBREVIATIONS

In references to Britain's Foreign Office files, the broad designation "FO 371" for documents in the Public Record Office has been omitted; the category is common to all items in the citations. Only the file and document numbers are noted: for example, 37479/R13545. In a few instances there is just one document in a file, and no item number is cited.

German Foreign Ministry documents have been cited using the microfilm copies available in the United States National Archives. Record Group 242 includes items from the years 1920-1945 and constitutes part of Microfilm Publication T120. Roll 52 covers German relations with Turkey during the period from November 1943 through April 1944. The roll and frame numbers are separated by a slash mark -- for example, 52/41937-41939 -- and are comparable to references to Volume IX of Akten des Politischen Archivs im Auswärtigen Amt.

Newspaper citations not identifying a page number are based on copies of articles obtained through clipping and archival services that did not record page information.

The following abbreviations have been used for convenience in note citations:

FMGerman Foreign Ministry
FOBritish Foreign Office

CHAPTER 1. THE "NOTORIOUS" CASE
1.
Ludwig C. Moyzisch, Operation Cicero, postscript by Franz von Papen, trans. Constantine FitzGibbon and Heinrich Fraenkel ( New York: CowardMcCann, 1950). The original title, Der Fall Cicero: Es geschah in Ankara -- Die sensationellste Spionageaffdre des Zweiten Weltkriegs ( Frankfurt: Die Quadriga, 1950), was more flamboyant. FitzGibbon later became convinced that the spy had been a double agent working for the British. His views are discussed

-205-

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The Cicero Spy Affair: German Access to British Secrets in World War II
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Preface ix
  • 1 - The "Notorious" Case 1
  • 2 - Turkey and the Powers 13
  • 3 - The Volunteer Spy 29
  • 4 - Selling the Secrets 43
  • 5 - Germany's Intelligence Labyrinth 57
  • 6 - Questions and Doubts In Berlin 69
  • 7 - Operation Bernhard 85
  • 8 - Cicero's Outstanding Period 97
  • 9 - The Contest for Turkey 113
  • 10 - Searching for an Agent 129
  • 11 - Cicero's Last Achievements 143
  • 12 - An American Spy 159
  • 13 - Dénouement and Aftermath 173
  • 14 - The Affair in Retrospect 187
  • Notes 205
  • Filmography 243
  • Selected Bibliography 247
  • Index 259
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