Gender and the Politics of Welfare Reform: Mothers' Pensions in Chicago, 1911-1929

By Joanne L. Goodwin | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

This book began as a dissertation at the University of Michigan and has been shaped by several individuals who helped me formulate the original questions and design of the study. Louise Tilly first drew my attention to the importance of examining gender in the process of state formation and set me on this worthwhile path. Mary Corcoran, Carol Karlsen, and Maris Vinovskis grounded this work with their own respective insights on poverty, gender, and policy history. I am most indebted to Terry McDonald, whose questions gave structure to my ideas, whose intellectual challenges made the work stronger, and whose wit and wisdom greatly enhanced the entire process. My career in academia began in the Women's History Program at Sarah Lawrence College under the able guidance of Amy Swerdlow. Her help and the intellectual stimulation of the college changed the direction of my professional life and formed the scholarly foundation for this work.

I am deeply appreciative of the financial support contributed toward the research and writing of this book by the American Council of Learned Societies, National Endowment for the Humanities Summer Stipend Program, American Historical Association's Albert J. Beveridge Grant for Research in the History of the Western Hemisphere, and the University of Michigan. A faculty development leave from the University of Nevada, Las Vegas, provided much needed time as I completed this book.

One of the most valued resources available to researchers is the able and willing assistance of librarians and archivists. I have benefited much from the aid of those associated with the Chicago Historical Society, Newberry Library, Library of Congress, National Archives, and the University of Chicago Library. Mary Ann Bamberger at the University Library of the University of Illinois at Chicago offered special assistance on my research questions over several years. I also want to thank the librarians at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas who helped considerably in the last round of manuscript preparation.

I am grateful to Blackwell Publishers for allowing me to reprint some of the material in chapters 1, 2, and 5 of this book, which previously appeared in "An American Experiment in Paid Motherhood: The Implementation of Mothers' Pensions in Early Twentieth Century Chicago," Gender and History 4:3

-xi-

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