International Handbook on Chemical Weapons Proliferation

By Gordon M. Burck; Charles C. Flowerree | Go to book overview

Chapter 8
The Americas

Among the geographic regions treated in this book, Central and South America have drawn the least attention as areas of suspect CW activity.

Latin America has a uniquely strong history of chemical arms control. In 1923 the five existing Central American states signed a convention adopting the ban on chemical and biological weapons that later was adopted in the Geneva Protocol. In 1924 the fifth International Conference of American States (including the United States) adopted an equivalent resolution. The Inter-American Peace Conference, held in December 1986, affirmed a ban on chemicals in warfare.1 In December 1990, the Brazilian foreign minister announced that his country and Argentina were negotiating an agreement to ban the production of chemical weapons.2

All of the Central and South American countries discussed here are classified in doubtful categories in the comprehensive assessments, except that Brazil is omitted entirely. Chile and Cuba are considered more likely than the others. Press reports vary.

None of these states was named in the 1989 congressional testimony of Director of Naval Intelligence Thomas Brooks as among states that "are developing or have achieved CW capabilities."3 This apparently confirms the belief of Pentagon officials who in 1984 reportedly said that the threat of chemical attack on US forces had not yet spread to the Western hemisphere.4 In the interim, however, there were allegations against Nicaragua and against Cuba in Angola.

Those latter allegations are probably reflected in the response of Robert Barker, deputy assistant secretary of defense (chemical matters), to a question from a congressman in 1987.5

Q: What are the over 17 nations that have chemical capacity? . . . Any in South America? A: [deleted in published text] in South America. And you could see that a large fraction of those are . . . Soviet client states.

-483-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
International Handbook on Chemical Weapons Proliferation
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 650

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.