Power and the Black Community: A Reader on Racial Subordination in the United States

By Sethard Fisher | Go to book overview

IV. Modern Gains,
Losses, and Patterns of
Suppression: The Kerner
Commission Report

Although major population shifts among black Americans have occurred since Emancipation, there have been only minor shifts in social position relative to white Americans. Black Americans have moved in large numbers from the rural to the urban South, and from the urban South to the urban North. Yet in the North or South, in rural or urban areas, black Americans are not proportionately represented in all strata of the social system of the United States.They are severely overrepresented at the very bottom of the stratification order and underrepresented in the middle and upper levels. The recent "Report of the National Advisory Commission on Civil Disorders" provides a descriptive account of the current black American condition, including some suggestions for change. Chapters 11 through 15 are drawn entirely from the Kerner Commission Report.

The first selection from this report is a treatment of population shifts among Negroes to the urban North and of the formation of racial ghettos. Chapters 12 and 13 deal with unemployment and family life within the ghetto and with more general ghetto life conditions such as crime, health and sanitation, and exploitation. The final two selections from the report deal with the immigrant and black American experience, and with a program of reform, respectively. Chapter 14 is in noteworthy contrast to black American studies which stress qualitative distinctions between Negroes and immigrant groups. Chapter 15 is noteworthy for its straightforward statement of reform goals and its failure to deal with the issue of means by which these goals are likely to be achieved. Chapter 16 attempts to present a more definitive characterization of black American history as a cyclic social process. It is within this context that the modern gains and losses of black Americans should be seen.

-149-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Power and the Black Community: A Reader on Racial Subordination in the United States
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 454

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.