Masked Men: Masculinity and the Movies in the Fifties

By Steven Cohan | Go to book overview

3
Tough Guys Make the Best Psychopaths

HE'S NO ROMEO

"I'm Tough And Intend to Remain That Way"
Says Hard Guy Humphrey Bogart

Hollywood, Calif. (June 00)— Humphrey Bogart is n-o-t going to become a screen Romeo, contrary to current rumors which seem to have stemmed from his recent and highly romantic marriage to Lauren (The Look) Bacall and his unpolished but ardent love work in such films as " To Have and Have Not," " Casablanca," and " Passage to Marseilles."

Says Mr. Bogart:

"If people have seen me as a romantic and pleasing-to-woman type, I am highly flattered and I shall go right on trying to please them.

"But, there's going to be no basic change in the kind of roles I do.

"I hope to go on playing everything that comes along in the story line—evil, criminal, romantic, sympathetic or what have you—just so long as it's tough. By that I mean that while I may give out with the tender feelings once in a while, I'll always be the toughie, the roughie, the kind of guy who's incapable of being eloquent about it.

"As a matter of fact," concluded Bogart, "I'm incapable of eloquence, on or off the screen. If you don't believe me, ask 'Baby.'" ( Warner Bros. Press Release)

When the history of Hollywood is written in some future epoch, the name Humphrey Bogart will undoubtedly appear on several pages of the index—as producer, pundit, and player of such diverse roles as Wall Street banker, treasure seeker and African river boatman.

But the page devoted to "tough guys" will probably abound in Bogart references, for no actor has typified the callous product of the American underworld—prison‐ bound, in-prison, just-out-of, and between-trips—as thoroughly as has Mr. Humphrey Bogart, late of Phillips Andover Academy. ("Biography")

These two excerpted press releases, one from 1945 and the other from 1955, roughly span the high point of Humphrey Bogart's popularity as a major box‐

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Masked Men: Masculinity and the Movies in the Fifties
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Arts and Politics of the Everyday *
  • Masked Men - Masculinity and the Movies in the Fifties *
  • Contents *
  • Acknowledgments *
  • Introduction *
  • 1: The Spy in the Gray Flannel Suit *
  • 2: The "Paradox" of Hegemonic Masculinity *
  • 3: Tough Guys Make the Best Psychopaths *
  • 4: The Body in the Blockbuster *
  • 5: The Age of the Chest *
  • 6: Why Boys Are Not Men *
  • 7: The Bachelor in the Bedroom *
  • Epilogue: Who Was That Masked Man? *
  • Notes *
  • Select Filmography *
  • Works Cited *
  • Index *
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