The Avant-Garde Tradition in Literature

By Richard Kostelanetz | Go to book overview

Points — Periphery — Concrete Poetry

Augusto de Campos

"Without presuming what will grow from this in the future, nothing or a nearart," said Mallarmé in the preface to the first version of Un coup de dés ( Cosmopolis magazine, 1897), opening the doors on a new poetic reality. 1

The various pugil-isms of the beginning of the century — in spite of their utility and necessity — had the misfortune of obscuring the importance of that "plant poem," that "great typographic and cosmogonic poem," worth more by itself than all the vanguardist shoutings of some years later.

Un coup de dés made of Mallarmé the inventor of a process of poetic composition whose significance seems to us comparable to the value of the "series," introduced by Schoenberg, purified by Webern, and through his filtration, bequeathed to the young electronic musicians presiding over the sonorous universe of Boulez and Stockhausen.I would define this process, from the beginning, by the word "structure," having in mind an entity where the whole is more than the sum of the parts or something qualitatively different from the individual components. Eisenstein, in the foundation of his theory of montage, and Pierre Boulez and Michel Fano, with reference to the principle of the series, testified — as artists — to their interest in the application of Gestalt concepts to the arts. And it is in the strictest Gestalt terms that we understand the title of one of e. e. cummings's books of poetry: Is 5. For poetry, and especially for the structural poetry of Mallarmé or cummings, two plus two can be rigorously equal to five.

____________________
The title "Points — Periphery — Concrete Poetry" stems from a Poundian aphorism ("Points define a periphery") that appears in the introduction to the new version of Analects of Confucius ( The Hudson Review, 3, no. 1 ( Spring 1950).
From Jornal do Brasil, Nov. 11, 1956. Reprinted by permission of Jon M. Tolman, translator.

-259-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Avant-Garde Tradition in Literature
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 424

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.