Builders and Deserters: Students, State, and Community in Leningrad, 1917-1941

By Peter Konecny | Go to book overview

Preface

On 25 December 1991 I sat with a group of Russian graduate students in front of the television in our dormitory, watching Mikhail Gorbachev deliver his final speech as president of the USSR. One would expect that this momentous occasion — the formal dissolution of the Soviet Union — would have produced reflective thoughts, passionate debate, and even a few tears. Instead, we noted the event by retiring to an adjacent room and engaging in a card game that went late into the night. Looking back, I could see that it had been a perfect moment that had captured not only the ambiguities of the deceased Soviet Union, but also the ironies of student life. Life in the dormitory, especially in times of social and political change, was full of unpredictable events.

During the course of the 1991-92 academic year in St Petersburg, I lived in the Shevchenko graduate student dormitory — a place familiar to many Western scholars. I had come to St Petersburg to conduct research for my doctoral dissertation, which examined the political and academic development of Leningrad State University during the inter‐ war period. Although the environment had changed substantially since the early years of the Soviet Union, many features remained the same. Like our predecessors, we battled with the dormitory administrator (the "commandant") for better sheets and furniture and we endured many cold nights without hot water. My student companions were probably not unlike the students I had chosen to study. That visit and several others over the ensuing years gave me a sense of the complex social and political environment within which student life in this city had evolved.

The dissolution of the Soviet Union in 1991 resulted in many new opportunities for research. Documents made recently available have added to our understanding of Stalinist high politics, relations between Moscow and the regions, and the character of everyday life in the

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Builders and Deserters: Students, State, and Community in Leningrad, 1917-1941
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 358

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.