The Welfare State Crisis and the Transformation of Social Service Work

By Michael B. Fabricant; Steve Burghardt | Go to book overview

1 • The Response to the Poor by a
Debtor State: The Economic and
Social Crises of the 1990s

Introduction: Unanswered Questions in Unsettling Times

Judy R. graduated from social work school in 1986 with a master's degree in social work and a deep commitment to work with the homeless. She accepted a low-paying job as coordinator of social services in a North Philadelphia homeless shelter. She loved her work with the homeless women and children who crowded her facility: finding needed entitlements, working with a mothers' support group, watching joy and hope fill the faces of families as they learned they would soon be moving to permanent housing.

Judy R. loved her work until the summer of 1990, that is, for at the end of the summer the city of Philadelphia, confronted with a $206 million deficit and a bond rating so poor that it could no longer sell its municipal bonds, withdrew almost all funding for homeless shelter facilities across the city (Hinds 1990a, 1990b). Even though the homeless population of Philadelphia continued to expand, Judy R. was out of a job.

Across the nation in the rural California county of Butte, Dorothy S., a native of Oroville, works as a Department of Social Services employee, handling cases of the one in six county residents who receive some form of welfare assistance. The size of its welfare load, comprised of chronically unemployed, unskilled workers, welfare recipients, and retirees on fixed incomes, is so large that 57 percent of the county budget goes to some form of social service. However, because the 185,000-person county, nestled in the center of the state about sixty miles from Sacramento, faces a deficit of $14.1 million in

-3-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Welfare State Crisis and the Transformation of Social Service Work
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 258

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.