The Life and Times of Daniel de Foe: With Remarks Digressive and Discursive

By William Chadwick | Go to book overview

CHAPTER IV.

AFTER his release from Newgate, De Foe took up his residence at Bury St. Edmund's, in Suffolk, as we have seen, where he resided in quietness, writing his books; but remained so long, that the Tory scamps of the day (for such were the paid scribes of that party for the most part) had to invent the slander, that he had run away from justice; in short, that he had not been seen since the £100 reward had been offered in the London Gazette for the apprehension of the writer of the Memorial to the Lords; and also that a government warrant was out against him as the author of this Memorial. This slander having so constantly appeared in the Tory Rehearsals, Observators, Craftsmen, True Britons, Examiners, Corn-cutters' Journal, and other newspapers or pamphlets, from Leslie down to Browne and Ward, that poor De Foe's credit was completely impaired ; at least he intimates as much in his Review at the time ; so that he had to advertise himself in his own Review as living at large at Bury St. Edmund's, where he could be found at any time ; and, as government had been mixed up with his retirement, and the slander of his having absconded, he wrote to the secretary of state to inform him that, if a government warrant was really out against him, he might be found living at Bury St. Edmund's ; to which notification he received a friendly reply, that the government were not in search of him.

On Nov. 4 he thus writes in his Review, page 291:—

"Whereas, in several written news-letters dispersed about the country, and supposed to be written by one Dyer, a news-writer, and by Mr. Fox, bookseller in Westminster Hall, it has falsely, and of mere malice, been scandalously asserted that Daniel De Foe was absconded and fled from justice; that he had been searched for by

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The Life and Times of Daniel de Foe: With Remarks Digressive and Discursive
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • The Life and Times of Daniel De Foe: *
  • The Preface. *
  • Contents *
  • Chapter I 1
  • Chapter II 57
  • Chapter III *
  • Chapter IV *
  • Chapter V *
  • Chapter VI *
  • Chapter VII *
  • Chapter VIII *
  • Chapter IX *
  • Chapter X *
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