The Life and Times of Daniel de Foe: With Remarks Digressive and Discursive

By William Chadwick | Go to book overview

CHAPTER VI.

IN the Review for July 18, 1706, De Foe announces a work for publication on the following Saturday; and a caution is given against the octavo edition, which was pirated and brought out at the same time; this work having been announced for publication so early as the year 1704, and subscriptions received on account of the work, and the work not appearing as announced, and partly subscribed for, great clamour was excited among the subscribers against the work, and against the author ; and this was the folio poem against the divine right of kings, entitled Jure Divino. This work is voluminous and patriotic ; but poor, perhaps, in the art of poetry, as may be accounted for by the fact of his being a prisoner in Newgate for writing the Shortest Way with the Dissenters when it was composed; and when his time must have been occupied with other subjects.

We might readily believe that the jovial brutality of the felons' yard at Newgate was not exactly congenial to poetic inspiration on the rights of peoples, or the usurpations of monarchs. No ! but so it was. Jure Divino was written, for the most part, in Newgate, when De Foe was a prisoner there in 1703 and 1704: and at a time when he was greatly occupied with the publication of his Review, and other works; for at this time he was truly industrious, as his various works fully testify; and on his release he was taken into diplomatic service by Harley, as a make-up, I suppose, for his forced neglect of his pamphleteer while confined in Newgate.He was liberated in the autumn of 1704 ; and in the following summer he was sent on some secret mission, fortified by govermental passports, into dangerous if not foreign parts ; where he travelled under the assumed name of Mr. Christopher Hurt. On this dangerous

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Life and Times of Daniel de Foe: With Remarks Digressive and Discursive
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • The Life and Times of Daniel De Foe: *
  • The Preface. *
  • Contents *
  • Chapter I 1
  • Chapter II 57
  • Chapter III *
  • Chapter IV *
  • Chapter V *
  • Chapter VI *
  • Chapter VII *
  • Chapter VIII *
  • Chapter IX *
  • Chapter X *
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 464

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.