The Life and Times of Daniel de Foe: With Remarks Digressive and Discursive

By William Chadwick | Go to book overview

CHAPTER X.

THE poor Queen was now very ill, the physicians and surgeons summoned, and a privy council called; to which the Dukes of Somerset and Argyle went uninvited, they claiming their privilege as privy councillors ; others followed their example in quick succession ; Bolingbroke and Mrs. Masham were outmarched by their opponents : the Queen was dead; and the council was seized by a strong majority of adherents of the house of Hanover; and from this moment—down went the prospects of the Pretender.

Immediate steps were at once taken for the security of the cities of London and Westminster, even two days before the Queen's death; and orders were given to the heralds at arms, and the Life Guards (for the Queen might die at any moment), to be in readiness to mount at the first warning, in order to proclaim the Elector of Hanover, King of Great Britain; and as Portsmouth had been left in a defenceless state (perhaps on purpose), six hundred men, out-pensioners of Chelsea Hospital, were marched there under Colonel Pocock, and such half-pay officers as were at hand; Brigadier Whetham was ordered off to Scotland; and the same day the fleet was placed under the command of the Earl of Berkeley.

Her Majesty expired on the 1st of August, in the fiftieth year of her age ; a good woman as wife, mother, and queen ; but—yet not a woman of a strong mind—No ! she was a weak-minded woman, the prey of bad, designing men. While all this was going on at court, Dr. Jonathan Swift was skulking off to Reading, in Berkshire, till the Queen should die, and be buried ; when he further skulked to Ireland, to his deanery of St. Patrick's, the proceeds of his iniquity; where he remained for the remainder of his life.

De Foe, in his Appeal to Honour and Justice, affirms, " that no sooner was the Queen dead, and the King, as right required, pro

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The Life and Times of Daniel de Foe: With Remarks Digressive and Discursive
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • The Life and Times of Daniel De Foe: *
  • The Preface. *
  • Contents *
  • Chapter I 1
  • Chapter II 57
  • Chapter III *
  • Chapter IV *
  • Chapter V *
  • Chapter VI *
  • Chapter VII *
  • Chapter VIII *
  • Chapter IX *
  • Chapter X *
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