HARLEY D. OBERHELMAN


The Development of Faulkner's Influence
in the Work of García Márquez

After García Márquez returned to Bogotá in 1954 to resume work for El Espectador, his journalistic and literary career in the years that follow is well documented. As he moved to Rome in 1955 and later to Paris as a correspondent and sometime student of cinematography, he continued to write fiction, but not without great economic difficulty due to the closing of El Espectador by the Rojas Pinilla dictatorship. El coronel no tiene quien le escriba came out in 1961, and La mala hora appeared the following year. García Márquez, however, refused to accept the 1962 edition of La mala hora, published in Madrid, because a Spanish proofreader made numerous changes in an effort to improve the style. Many words also were changed to more "acceptable" terms. The first edition of this novel that the author was willing to accept was done four years later in Mexico. The volume of short stories called Los funerales de la Mamá Grande also came out in 1962.

After a journalistic venture to the Iron Curtain countries, where he did a series of ten articles, and a return to Bogotá and Caracas for additional forays into newspaper work, he opened the office of Fidel Castro's Prensa Latina in the Colombian capital, went briefly to Havana, and was sent in 1960 by Prensa Latina to become assistant bureau chief in its New York office. He remained in New York only a few months, resigned from Prensa Latina, and made a trip through the South for the purpose of seeing Faulkner country first hand. Continuing in 1961 with his family on to

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From The Presence of Faulkner in the Writings of García Márquez. Graduate Studies—Texas Tech University, no. 22 ( August 1980). © 1980 by Texas Tech Press.

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