ANIBAL GONZÁLEZ


Translation and the Novel:
One Hundred Years of Solitude

The concept of the definitive text belongs only to religion or to
exhaustion
.

— BORGES, "The Homeric Versions" ( 1932)

Cela [l'histoire du Babel] inscrit la scène de la traduction dans
un espace qui est justement celui de la généalogie des noms
propres
, de la famille, de l'endettement, de la loi, d l'intérieur
d'une scène d'héritage.

— DERRIDA, L'Oreille de l'autre ( 1982)

Gabriel García Márquez's One Hundred Years of Solitude stands today as an undisputed classic of Latin American letters, and, like all classics, it has been subjected to countless readings, from source studies to formal analyses to readings oriented by the latest critical theories. Like Cervantes 's Don Quixoteto which it has been compared many times— One Hundred Years of Solitude offers a richness and a density that allows succeeding generations of readers to add further comments to its already abundant critical legacy. It is not altogether delirious to see in García Márquez's masterpiece, as one critic [ Samuel García] has done, a kind of synthesis of "three thousand years of literature"; a novel that deals with such basic issues related to writing, history, and literature as One Hundred Years of Solitude does, cannot but evoke a good portion of the literary tradition that has preceded it. One of the many fundamental issues that are addressed in One Hundred Years of Solitude is that of translation, and of translation's links with the writing of this particular novel as well as

____________________
Published for the first time in this volume. © 1987 by Anibal González.

-271-

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