Contributors

HAROLD BLOOM, Sterling Professor of the Humanities at Yale University, is the author of The Anxiety of Influence, Poetry and Repression, and many other volumes of literary criticism. His forthcoming study, Freud: Transference and Authority, attempts a full-scale reading of all of Freud's major writings. A MacArthur Prize Fellow, he is general editor of five series of literary criticism published by Chelsea House. During 1987-88, he was appointed Charles Eliot Norton Professor of Poetry at Harvard University.

JOHN HOLLANDER, poet and critic, is A. Bartlett Giamatti Professor of English at Yale University.His books include Spectral Emanations: New and Selected Poems and The Poem of the Mind.

PATRICIA PARKER is Professor of English and Comparative Literature at the University of Toronto.She is the author of Inescapable Romance and the coeditor of Lyric Poetry: Beyond New Criticism, Literary Theory and Renaissance Texts, and Shakespeare and the Question of Theory.

JOHN GUILLORY, Associate Professor of English at Yale University, has written Poetic Authority and a forthcoming study of canon-formation.

WILLIAM KERRIGAN, Professor of English at the University of Virginia, has published two critical studies of Milton and a number of essays on Freud and Kierkegaard.

MAUREEN QUILLIGAN is Professor of English at the University of Pennsylvania.She is the author of The Language of Allegory and Milton's Spenser.

GORDON BRADEN is Associate Professor of English at the University of Virginia.He is the author of The Classical and English Renaissance Poetry and Renaissance Tragedy and the Senecan Tradition.

-159-

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John Milton's Paradise Lost
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • John Milton's Paradise Lost *
  • Contents v
  • Editor's Note vii
  • Introduction 1
  • Milton and Transumption 13
  • Echo Schematic 31
  • Eve, Evening, and the Labor of Reading in Paradise Lost 43
  • Ithuriel's Spear: History and the Language of Accommodation 65
  • One First Matter All: Spirit as Energy 91
  • The Gender of Milton's Muse and the Problem of the Fit Reader 125
  • Milton's Coy Eve: Paradise Lost and Renaissance Love Poetry 133
  • Chronology 157
  • Contributors 159
  • Bibliography 161
  • Acknowledgments 169
  • Index 171
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