Charlotte Brontë's Jane Eyre

By Harold Bloom | Go to book overview
chronology
1812
The Reverend Patrick Brontë marries Maria Branwell.
1814
Maria Brontë, their first child, born.
1815
Elizabeth Brontë born.
1816
Charlotte Brontë born on April 21.
1817
Patrick Branwell Brontë, the only son, born in June.
1818
Emily Jane Brontë born on July 30.
1820
Anne Brontë born on January 17. The Brontë family moves to the parsonage at Haworth, near Bradford, Yorkshire.
1821
Mrs. Brontë dies of cancer in September. Her sister, Elizabeth Branwell, takes charge of the household.
1824
Maria and Elizabeth attend the Clergy Daughters' School at Cowan Bridge.Charlotte follows them in August, and Emily in November.
1825
The two oldest girls, Maria and Elizabeth, contract tuberculosis at school. Maria dies on May 6; Elizabeth dies June 15. Charlotte and Emily are withdrawn from the school on June 1. Charlotte and Emily do not return to school until they are in their teens; in the meantime they are educated at home.
1826
Reverend Brontë brings home a box of wooden soldiers for his son; this is the catalyst for the creation of the Brontës' juvenile fantasy worlds and writings. Charlotte and Branwell begin the "Angrian" stories and magazines; Emily and Anne work on the "Gondal" saga.
1831
Charlotte attends Miss Wooler's school. She leaves the school seven months later, to tend to her sisters' education. In 1835, however, she returns as governess. She is accompanied by Emily.
1835
After only three months, Emily leaves Miss Wooler's

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Charlotte Brontë's Jane Eyre
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Modern Critical Interpretations *
  • Modern Critical Interpretations *
  • Modern Critical Interpretations *
  • Contents *
  • Editor's Note vii
  • Introduction 1
  • The Shape of the Novel 7
  • Providence Invoked: Dogmatic Form in Jane Eyre and Robinson Crusoe 21
  • Jane Eyre: A Marxist Study 29
  • The End of Jane Eyre and the Creation of a Feminist Myth 47
  • A Dialogue of Self and Soul: Plain Jane's Progress 63
  • Jane Eyre in Search of Her Story 97
  • Dreaming of Children: Literalization in Jane Eyre 113
  • Chronology 133
  • Contributors 137
  • Bibliography 139
  • Acknowledgments 143
  • Index 145
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