Ernest Hemingway's A Farewell to Arms

By Harold Bloom | Go to book overview
Chronology
1899
Hemingway born July 21 in Oak Park, Illinois.
1917
Works as reporter on Kansas City Star.
1918
Service in Italy with the American Red Cross; wounded on July 8 near Fossalta di Piave; affair with nurse Agnes von Kurowsky.
1920
Reporter for Toronto Star.
1921
Marries Hadley Richardson; moves to Paris.
1922
Reports Greco-Turkish War for Toronto Star.
1923
Three Stories and Ten Poems published in Paris.
1924
A collection of vignettes, in our time, published in Paris by three mountains press.
1925
Attends Fiesta de San Fermin in Pamplona with Harold Loeb, Pat Guthrie, Duff Twysden, and others. In Our Time, which adds fourteen short stories to the earlier vignettes, is published in New York by Horace Liveright.It is Hemingway's first American book.
1926
The Torrents of Spring and The Sun Also Rises published by Charles Scribner's Sons.
1927
Men without Women published. Marries Pauline Pfeiffer.
1928
Moves to Key West.
1929
A Farewell to Arms published.
1932
Death in the Afternoon published.
1933
Winner Take Nothing published.
1935
Green Hills of Africa published.
1937
To Have and Have Not published. Returns to Spain as war correspondent on the Loyalist side.
1938
Writes script for the film The Spanish Earth. The Fifth Column and the First Forty-Nine Stories published.

-149-

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Ernest Hemingway's A Farewell to Arms
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Ernest Hemingway's a Farewell to Arms *
  • Modern Critical Interpretations *
  • A Farewell to Arms *
  • Contents *
  • Editor's Note vii
  • Introduction 1
  • The Novel as Pure Poetry 9
  • Tragic Form in a Farewell to Arms 25
  • A Farewell to Arms: A Dream Book 33
  • Going Back 49
  • Hemingway's "Resentful Cryptogram" 61
  • The Sense of an Ending in a Farewell to Arms 77
  • Frederic Henry's Escape and the Pose of Passivity 97
  • Pseudoautobiography and Personal Metaphor 113
  • Catherine Barkley and the Hemingway Code: Ritual and Survival in a Farewell to Arms 131
  • Chronology 149
  • Contributors 151
  • Bibliography 153
  • Acknowledgments 157
  • Index 159
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