The Spanish-Americans of New Mexico: A Heritage of Pride

By Nancie L. González | Go to book overview

don't participate in community affairs or community organizations. Very few parents show up at PTA meetings, Scout pack meetings, or at church, social, or action groups" ( Rahm 1958:11). Today, with increasing economic resources and acculturation, even this picture is changing, at least in Albuquerque.

However, it must be remembered that Spanish-Americans, like anyone else, join those organizations which benefit them. Most Anglo organizations have not served the needs of Hispanos who have different life styles and goals. But as these change, so do both the joining habits of the Hispanos themselves and their acceptability as a class to the Anglo-dominated organizations. And finally, in addition to joining more and more of the existing Anglo groups, there is evidence that the pattern of organized activity for generalized as well as for specific goals seems to be increasing in importance among Hispanos. Thus, groups like the Alianza, although superficially organized for the specific purpose of regaining lost lands, have a broader purpose in fighting discrimination and dissatisfaction among lower-income, less- privileged sectors. This new concept of organization seems related to the general trend toward modernization which has been gaining impetus over the past twenty years, or since World War II, and which will be discussed in detail in the final chapters.


Notes
1
This characteristic has been discussed or mentioned by many, including the following: Cochrane ( 1915:38); Edmonson ( 1957:63); Holmes ( 1964:136); Johansen ( 1941b:157); Judah ( 1961:10); Loomis and Leonard ( 1938:7); Madsen ( 1961:19); Rubel ( 1966); Saunders and Samora ( 1955:394). Madsen and Rubel refer primarily to Mexican-Americans of South Texas, while Cochrane and Johansen are concerned with southern New Mexico, the population of which seems generally more like that of the Texas Mexican-Americans. The last

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The Spanish-Americans of New Mexico: A Heritage of Pride
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Acknowledgments vi
  • Contents vii
  • Introduction ix
  • Notes xv
  • Chapter I - Setting 5
  • Notes 14
  • Chapter II - Language, Race, and Culture 15
  • Notes 30
  • Chapter III - Early Settlement and Traditional Culture 33
  • Notes 55
  • Chapter IV - Social System 58
  • Notes 83
  • Chapter V - Voluntary Associations 86
  • Notes 114
  • Chapter VI - The Wages of Change 116
  • Notes 134
  • Chapter VII - Effects of Urbanization 136
  • Notes 176
  • Chapter VIII - The Continuing Scene: Activism in New Mexico, 1966-1969 179
  • Notes 195
  • Chapter IX - Summary and Conclusions 197
  • Notes 213
  • Bibliography 215
  • Index 237
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