Diana Chang
b. 1934

DIANA CHANG was born in 1934 in New York City to a Eurasian mother and Chinese father. She spent her early childhood in Beijing and Shanghai, however, until her family fled Communist China and returned to New York, where Chang's father began work as an architect. In New York, Chang attended high school and Barnard College, where she studied creative writing and read, among others, existentialist philosophers; she has said that she was especially affected by Kierkegaard.After graduating, she worked full time as a junior editor at various publishing houses but finally quit, despite economic difficulties, so that she could spend more time writing.

Her first novel, The Frontiers of Love, was published in 1956 to much critical acclaim. Five other novels and three collections of poetry followed. Pursuing "universal" themes, Chang has said that she often subsumes aspects of her Eurasian background "in the interests of other truths and recognitions"; one of her abiding preoccupations has been the issue of identity. Her work has also appeared in magazines, including American Scholar, Nation, New Letters, New York Quarterly, and Virginia Quarterly Review. She is an accomplished painter as well and has exhibited her work in solo and group shows.

Chang has taught creative writing and interdisciplinary art courses at Barnard College and currently lives in Water Mill, New York.


CRITICAL EXTRACTS

SAMANTHA RAMA RAU

The pathos and the problems of the Eurasian in Asia have, for a long time, interested Westerners, sometimes from the point of view of the Eurasians' anomalous political position, and sometimes (notably in the writing of Joseph Hitrec and John Masters) because of their emotional complexities. It is relatively seldom, however, that one is given a convincing and interior view of the Eurasian world, written, so to speak, from the inside looking out and embracing both the political and emotional dilemmas of that twilit no-man's-land.

Whether or not Diana Chang's "The Frontiers of Love" is largely autobiographical is a matter of complete irrelevance, for she brings to the background and descriptive detail of her story an authenticity that stands up equally well

-1-

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Asian American Women Writers
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Asian‐ American Women Writers *
  • Contents *
  • The Analysis of Women Writers xi
  • Introduction xv
  • Diana Chang B. 1934 1
  • Edith Maude Eaton 1865-1914 Winnifred Eaton 1875-1954 14
  • Jessica Tarahata Hagedorn B. 1949 28
  • Maxine Hong Kingston B. 1940 37
  • Joy Kogawa B. 1935 53
  • Bharati Mukherjee B. 1938 68
  • Amy Tan B. 1952 81
  • Linda Ty-Casper B. 1931 98
  • Jade Snow Wong B. 1919 110
  • Hisaye Yamamoto B. 1921 121
  • Wakako Yamauchi B. 1924 133
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