Bharati Mukherjee
b. 1938

BHARATI MUKHERJEE was born in 1938 in Calcutta, India, to an upper-class Hindu family of Brahmin caste, the top of India's social hierarchy. Her parents sent Mukherjee and her sisters to a British convent school and later to private schools in London and Switzerland. Caught, on one hand, between the privileges of caste status and the submissiveness demanded of Indian women and, on the other, between an Indian heritage and an Anglophilic upbringing, Mukherjee experienced a dichotomous childhood. Her allegiance to her native country was weakened by the message ingrained in her by school, family, and community: that the future lay in the West. So, in 1961, she arrived in Iowa City, with a scholarship to attend the writer's workshop at the University of Iowa; she earned an M.F.A. in creative writing and a Ph.D. in English and comparative literature. Her first novel, The Tiger's Daughter, explored aspects of the divided allegiance of her childhood.

At the University of Iowa, Mukherjee met and married Clark Blaise; upon graduation, the couple moved to his native Canada. With their two young sons, they first resided in Toronto and later moved to Montreal, where both had teaching positions (at McGill University and Concordia University). However, Canada did not embrace Mukherjee; she experienced overt discrimination, and her writing was largely ignored. Her powerful essay, " An Invisible Woman," and several early short stories reflect her unhappiness during this period and protest the prejudice against Canadians of Indian descent.

Days and Nights in Calcutta and The Sorrow and the Terror: The Haunting Legacy of the Air India Tragedy, nonfiction works cowritten by Mukherjee and her husband, consider conflicts between the Third World and the First World, the ordeal of exile, and the immigrant's search for a sense of rootedness. In Days and Nights, husband and wife recount, each in a distinct narrative, a year-long visit to Calcutta, creating at once a dual travel memoir and an intimate, self-reflexive look at how each experiences cultural differences. Their second collaboration, The Sorrow and the Terror, is an exposé of the crash of Air India Flight 182 that investigates the Canadian government's ineffectual treatment of what was officially declared a "disaster imported from India."

Discouraged by their experiences in Canada, Mukherjee and Blaise finally gave up their tenured professorships in 1980 and moved to the United States.Life in the United States spurred an explosion of

-68-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Asian American Women Writers
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Asian‐ American Women Writers *
  • Contents *
  • The Analysis of Women Writers xi
  • Introduction xv
  • Diana Chang B. 1934 1
  • Edith Maude Eaton 1865-1914 Winnifred Eaton 1875-1954 14
  • Jessica Tarahata Hagedorn B. 1949 28
  • Maxine Hong Kingston B. 1940 37
  • Joy Kogawa B. 1935 53
  • Bharati Mukherjee B. 1938 68
  • Amy Tan B. 1952 81
  • Linda Ty-Casper B. 1931 98
  • Jade Snow Wong B. 1919 110
  • Hisaye Yamamoto B. 1921 121
  • Wakako Yamauchi B. 1924 133
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 142

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.