Linda Ty-Casper
b. 1931

LINDA TY-CASPER was born on September 17, 1931, in Manila, the Philippines.Her father, a civil engineer, and mother, an educator and writer, hoped that their daughter would become a doctor or a lawyer. Though the future novelist did graduate from law school, she records feeling the desire to write as early as the age of five.

After graduating from the University of the Philippines, where she earned a degree in law, Linda married Leonard R. Casper, a professor and writer, with whom she subsequently had two daughters. In 1956, the couple moved to Boston, where Ty-Casper enrolled in Harvard Law School and began writing short stories. While awaiting bar exam results, she began systematically to read the books about the Philippines in the Harvard library.Finding them full of misinformation and colonialist perspectives, she was inspired to redress this view of her homeland in a revisionist historical novel, The Peninsulars. Unfortunately, it remained unpublished until after the release of her first collection of short stories, The Transparent Sun and Other Stories, in 1963.

Subsequent novels, short stories, and articles have drawn critical praise for their lyricism despite Ty-Casper's delving into the disturbing and often brutal realities of Filipino society, from a 300-year history of colonization and political corruption to the trauma of exile and repatriation. Real incidents, like the bombing of Plaza Miranda in Manila and the overthrow of the Marcos regime, frequently provide the material or structure of her stories. Writing about the people and places of her native country, Ty-Casper also interweaves basic elements of life and humanity—love, death, family, survival, freedom.

Ty-Casper periodically teaches writing workshops and publishes in magazines and newspapers in the United States and abroad. She was a Fellow at Silliman University in 1963 and at the Radcliffe Institute in 1974 to 1975, and a writer in residence at the University of the Philippines in 1980 and 1982. Her work has appeared in many anthologies, including Best American Short Stories of 1977. In 1985, she received a literature award from the Filipino American Women's Network, and in 1986, Awaiting Trespass was selected for inclusion in the Feminist Book Fortnight of Britain and Ireland.

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Asian American Women Writers
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Asian‐ American Women Writers *
  • Contents *
  • The Analysis of Women Writers xi
  • Introduction xv
  • Diana Chang B. 1934 1
  • Edith Maude Eaton 1865-1914 Winnifred Eaton 1875-1954 14
  • Jessica Tarahata Hagedorn B. 1949 28
  • Maxine Hong Kingston B. 1940 37
  • Joy Kogawa B. 1935 53
  • Bharati Mukherjee B. 1938 68
  • Amy Tan B. 1952 81
  • Linda Ty-Casper B. 1931 98
  • Jade Snow Wong B. 1919 110
  • Hisaye Yamamoto B. 1921 121
  • Wakako Yamauchi B. 1924 133
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