The Spanish-Americans of New Mexico: A Heritage of Pride

By Nancie L. González | Go to book overview

contrasted with religious, ceremonies is not supported by the present study. Indeed, Johnson's own data, when submitted to a more rigorous statistical analysis, do not support her conclusion. There was a significant increase in civil marriages between the 1915-1916 and the 1925-1926 samples, but after that there is no significant trend whatever. When comparable figures for years covered in this research were placed in sequence with Johnson's figures, no significant patterns were apparent. If anything, the data indicate a possible reverse trend toward increasing numbers of religious ceremonies since 1945.

Thus, this evidence, plus that given above, suggests that the Spanish-Americans of New Mexico, unlike what has been reported for other areas, tend to cling to their traditional religious affiliation. Furthermore, the data concerning type of marriage do not indicate any increasing secularization over the years in Bernalillo County. This may or may not be significant in relation to urbanization. It would be valuable to have comparable information concerning types of marriage ceremonies in a predominantly rural county over a period of years to determine what effect, if any, urbanization may have upon this behavior. Neither can the author explain, on the basis of present evidence, the significant increase in civil ceremonies which took place between 1915-1916 and 1925-1926 in this county. Whatever the causative factors were, they apparently no longer operate at the present time.


Notes
1
Professor Morris Forslund of the Department of Sociology, University of New Mexico, supplied these figures from his own research materials. (Personal communication.)
2
The following list does not pretend to be exhaustive. It is included merely to

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The Spanish-Americans of New Mexico: A Heritage of Pride
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Acknowledgments vi
  • Contents vii
  • Introduction ix
  • Notes xv
  • Chapter I - Setting 5
  • Notes 14
  • Chapter II - Language, Race, and Culture 15
  • Notes 30
  • Chapter III - Early Settlement and Traditional Culture 33
  • Notes 55
  • Chapter IV - Social System 58
  • Notes 83
  • Chapter V - Voluntary Associations 86
  • Notes 114
  • Chapter VI - The Wages of Change 116
  • Notes 134
  • Chapter VII - Effects of Urbanization 136
  • Notes 176
  • Chapter VIII - The Continuing Scene: Activism in New Mexico, 1966-1969 179
  • Notes 195
  • Chapter IX - Summary and Conclusions 197
  • Notes 213
  • Bibliography 215
  • Index 237
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