CHAPTER VIII
Justinian, Theodora, and the Golden Age

THE FIRST GOLDEN AGE of Byzantium coincided with the reign of Justinian and his consort Theodora, one of the few married couples in history to set their seal on an era. And if this age, more than most, is marked by the almost living personalities of its leading figures, is it altogether fanciful to suppose that this is partly so because their features are so familiar? For fourteen centuries the mosaic portraits of Justinian and Theodora have faced each other across the apse of S. Vitale at Ravenna, and there they both, in a sense, still live, separated from the modern world in time alone, in that indirect yet almost intimate relationship with the viewer of today that characterizes the appearance of the Sovereign on the balcony at Buckingham Palace to the crowd at the gates. Justinian, with his blunt, uncompromising rather swarthy features and thinning hair; Theodora, svelte, intense and self-possessed-- few portraits, even including Holbein's Henry the Eighth, the very embodiment of a new and vulgar England--so successfully project the personalities of their subjects across the centuries.

The civilization of sixth-century Byzantium was, above all, Christian, and since neither before nor since has so complete an amalgam of European and Oriental traditions been possible, its art has a transcendental quality that alone fully expresses the material catholicity of the Christian heritage. Within little more than a century, although Byzantine relations with Western Europe were not completely severed, the new nations in process of formation there had little or nothing to contribute, while in the East, Syria and Egypt were lost to Islam, and so the great centres of Alexandria and Antioch ceased to play any distinctive role. In the half century or so that is spanned by the

-187-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Early Christians
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 270

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.