Ecoscience: Population, Resources, Environment

By Paul R. Ehrlich; Anne H. Ehrlich et al. | Go to book overview

Krier, J. E. 1975. Environmental law and its administration. In Environment: Resources, pollution, and society, W. W. Murdoch, ed., 2d ed. Sinauer, Sunderland, Mass., pp. 413-436. An excellent treatment.

Lovins, Amory. 1976. "Energy strategy: The road not taken?" Foreign Affairs, October. A brilliant essay dealing with the social choices required to move society off its present disastrous course.

Lowrance, W. W. 1976. Of accepted risk. Science and the determination of safety. Kaufmann, Los Altos, Calif. The best overview of the evaluation of hazards created by technologies.

Mishan, Ezra J. 1967. The costs of economic growth. Praeger, New York. A pioneering discussion.

Pirages, Dennis C., and Paul R. Ehrlich. 1974. Ark II: Social response to environmental imperatives. W. H. Freeman and Company, San Francisco. An analysis of changes in society that might help forestall the fate predicted by Roberto Vacca, The coming dark age. Notes and bibliography give access to much of the pertinent literature of economics, political science, sociology, and the like.

Schumacher, E. F. 1973. Small is beautiful: Economics as if people mattered. Harper and Row, New York. One of the most important economic books of the 1970s -- a must.

Stone, C. D. 1974. "Should trees have standing? Toward legal rights for natural objects". Kaufmann, Los Altos, Calif. Originally published in the Southern California law review (1972), this beautifully written essay is a must for anyone interested in the law and the environment.

Watt, K. E. F. 1974. The Titanic effect: Planning for the unthinkable. Sinauer, Stamford, Conn. An analysis by an ecologist showing the economic problems created by shortsighted emphasis on growth of the GNP.


Additional References
Arrow, K. J., and A. C. Fisher. 1974. "Environmental preservation, uncertainty, and irreversibility". The Quarterly Journal of Economics, vol. 88, pp. 312-319 (May). Application of economic formalism to the problem of irreversible risk.
Asimov, Isaac. 1970. "The fourth revolution". Saturday Review, October 24, pp. 17-20. On the potentialities of electronic communications to revolutionize world society.
Aspin, Les. 1972. "The space shuttle: Who needs it?" Washington Monthly, September. A congressman looks at NASA's maneuvering for dollars.
Ayres, Edward. 1970. What's good for GM. Aurora, Nashville. An indictment of the degree to which the United States is run for the automobile. Full of useful information such as, "In 1969, as a result of auto and highway clout, the federal government spent $50 on highways for every dollar it spent on mass transit."
Baker, J. J. W. 1975. "Three modes of protest action". Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists, February, pp. 8-15. Describes scientists' statement against the birth-control encyclical of Pope Paul VI.
Barber, Richard. 1970. The American corporation. Dutton, New York. Gives information on concentration of power.
Barkley, P. W., and D. W. Seckler. 1972. Economic growth and environmental decay: The solution becomes the problem. Harcourt Brace Jovanovich, New York. An incisive book by two economists. Highly recommended.
Barlay, Stephen. 1970. The search for air safety. Morrow, New York. Detailed analysis of aviation accidents.
Barnet, Richard. 1972. Roots of war. Atheneum, New York. A controversial treatment of the domestic roots of America's foreign interventions.

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