CHAPTER VII

THE harder Tom tried to fasten his mind on his book, the more his ideas wandered. So at last, with a sigh and a yawn, he gave it up. It seemed to him that the noon recess would never come. The air was utterly dead. There was not a breath stirring. It was the sleepiest of sleepy days. The drowsing murmur of the five and twenty studying scholars soothed the soul like the spell that is in the murmur of bees. Away off in the flaming sunshine, Cardiff Hill lifted its soft green sides through a shimmering veil of heat, tinted with the purple of distance; a few birds floated on lazy wing high in the air; no other living thing was visible but some cows, and they were asleep. Tom's heart ached to be free, or else to have something of interest to do to pass the dreary time. His hand wandered into his pocket and his face lit up with a glow of gratitude that was prayer, though he did not know it. Then furtively the percussion-cap box came out. He released the tick and put him on the long flat desk. The creature probably glowed with a gratitude that amounted to prayer, too, at this moment, but it was premature: for when he started thankfully to travel off, Tom turned him aside with a pin and made him take a new direction.

-65-

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The Adventures of Tom Sawyer
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page v
  • Contents ix
  • Preface xi
  • Chapter I 1
  • Chapter II 12
  • Chapter III 20
  • Chapter IV 29
  • Chapter V 43
  • Chapter VI 50
  • Chapter VII 65
  • Chapter VIII 73
  • Chapter IX 80
  • Chapter X 89
  • Chapter XI 98
  • Chapter XII 104
  • Chapter XIII 111
  • Chapter XIV 121
  • Chapter XV 129
  • Chapter XVI 136
  • Chapter XVII 149
  • Chapter XVIII 154
  • Chapter XIX 166
  • Chapter XX 170
  • Chapter XXI 177
  • Chapter XXII 185
  • Chapter XXIII 189
  • Chapter XXIV 198
  • Chapter XXV 200
  • Chapter XXVI 209
  • Chapter XXVII 220
  • Chapter XXVIII 224
  • Chapter XXIX 229
  • Chapter XXX 239
  • Chapter XXXI 251
  • Chapter XXXII 263
  • Chapter XXXIII 267
  • Chapter XXXIV 281
  • Chapter XXXV 285
  • Conclusion 292
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