CHAPTER XXXII

T UESDAY afternoon came, and waned to the twilight. The village of St. Petersburg still mourned. The lost children had not been found. Public prayers had been offered up for them, and many and many a private prayer that had the petitioner's whole heart in it; but still no good news came from the cave. The majority of the searchers had given up the quest and gone back to their daily vocations, saying that it was plain the children could never be found. Mrs. Thatcher was very ill, and a great part of the time delirious. People said it was heartbreaking to hear her call her child, and raise her head and listen a whole minute at a time, then lay it wearily down again with a moan. Aunt Polly had drooped into a settled melancholy, and her gray hair had grown almost white. The village went to its rest on Tuesday night, sad and forlorn.

Away in the middle of the night a wild peal burst from the village bells, and in a moment the streets were swarming with frantic half-clad people, who shouted, "Turn out! turn out! they're found! they're found!" Tin pans and horns were added to the din, the population massed itself and moved toward the river, met the children coming in an open carriage drawn by shouting citizens, thronged

-263-

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The Adventures of Tom Sawyer
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page v
  • Contents ix
  • Preface xi
  • Chapter I 1
  • Chapter II 12
  • Chapter III 20
  • Chapter IV 29
  • Chapter V 43
  • Chapter VI 50
  • Chapter VII 65
  • Chapter VIII 73
  • Chapter IX 80
  • Chapter X 89
  • Chapter XI 98
  • Chapter XII 104
  • Chapter XIII 111
  • Chapter XIV 121
  • Chapter XV 129
  • Chapter XVI 136
  • Chapter XVII 149
  • Chapter XVIII 154
  • Chapter XIX 166
  • Chapter XX 170
  • Chapter XXI 177
  • Chapter XXII 185
  • Chapter XXIII 189
  • Chapter XXIV 198
  • Chapter XXV 200
  • Chapter XXVI 209
  • Chapter XXVII 220
  • Chapter XXVIII 224
  • Chapter XXIX 229
  • Chapter XXX 239
  • Chapter XXXI 251
  • Chapter XXXII 263
  • Chapter XXXIII 267
  • Chapter XXXIV 281
  • Chapter XXXV 285
  • Conclusion 292
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