Good News, Bad News: Journalism Ethics and the Public Interest

By Jeremy Iggers | Go to book overview

Notes

Introduction
1.
Speech given at the University of South Dakota, Vermillion, SD, Wednesday, October 16, 1996.
2.
Jane McCartney, "News Lite," American Journalism Record ( June 1997), p. 19.
3.
Carl Sessions Stepp, "The Thrill Is Gone," American Journalism Review ( October 1995), pp. 15-19.
4.
Times Mirror Center for the People and the Press, Washington, DC, April 6, 1995, pp. 9, 29, cited in Jay Rosen, Getting the Connections Right: Public Journalism and the Troubles in the Press ( New York: Twentieth Century Fund Press, 1996) p. 19.
5.
Hoag Levins, "Newspapers May Lose 14% to Internet/Research Firm Predicts 5 Year Readership Decline," E&P Interactive, Friday, November 1, 1996.
6.
Pew Research Center for The People and The Press, National Social Trust Survey, February 1997 ( Washington, DC). Results summarized in the Pew Research Center's online 1997 Media Report.
7.
James Fallows, Breaking the News: How the Media Undermine American Democracy ( New York: Pantheon Books, 1996), p. 3.
8.
Jay Rosen and Davis Merritt Jr., "Public Journalism: Theory and Practice," an Occasional Paper of the Kettering Foundation ( Dayton, OH: Kettering Foundation, 1994), p. 4.
9.
Jay Black, Bob Steele, and Ralph Barney, Doing Ethics in Journalism: A Handbook with Case Studies ( Greencastle, IN: The Sigma Delta Chi Foundation and the Society of Professional Journalists, 1993).
10.
Ellen Hume, "Why the Press Blew the S&L Scandal," New York Times, May 24, 1990, A25; cited in Robert Parry, Fooling America ( New York: William Morris, 1992), p. 12.

Chapter One
1.
The National News Council, A fter "Jimmy's World": Tightening Up in Editing ( New York: The National News Council, 1981).
2.
Jay Black, "Journalism Ethics Education Since Janet Cooke," paper presented at the Poynter Institute, St. Petersburg, FL, 1991.
3.
Stephen Klaidman and Tom L. Beauchamp, The Virtuous Journalist ( New York: Oxford University Press, 1987).
4.
Klaidman and Beauchamp, The Virtuous Journalist, p. 173.

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