Foreign Policy Decision-Making: A Qualitative and Quantitative Analysis of Political Argumentation

By Irmtraud N. Gallhofer; Willem E. Saris | Go to book overview

In this way we try to demonstrate that the findings of this book and the approach used are of more general significance than the mere generalization of our empirical evidence would formally allow.


ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

This book represents the efforts of many people. Many students have helped to gather the data, but it would not be practical to try to thank by name everyone who has contributed by coding, if only for fear of inadvertently omitting some of the coders. To all of them, our thanks. Special thanks go to Maarten Schellekens, who, together with the authors of this book, carried out the validation study of individual decision rules. Additional thanks go to the department of Methods and Techniques for Social Sciences of the Free University of Amsterdam, who in the 1970s provided funds for the development of the content analysis approach. We would also like to thank the Dutch Organization for the Advancement of Pure Research (NWO, formerly ZWO) for financing part of this research (grant nr. 43-114). We are also grateful for valuable information on substantive matters and comment on some case studies from the late prime minister, Willem Drees, Sr., and the late minister of foreign affairs, Eelco Van Kleffens. Since most of the documents under investigation were secret and unpublished, we needed to get access to the archives of the Council of Ministers, the Ministries of Foreign Affairs, Economics, and Defense, and to several collections in the State Archives. We therefore wish to express our gratitude to those officials who gave us access, and especially to Mr. M. de Graaff at the State Archives, who helped us on several occasions in the most pleasant way to find the required documents. Last but not least, we wish to thank Mr. M. Pearson for his efforts to correct our English.

-xi-

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