Foreign Policy Decision-Making: A Qualitative and Quantitative Analysis of Political Argumentation

By Irmtraud N. Gallhofer; Willem E. Saris | Go to book overview

Appendix A
Guidelines for the Construction of Decision Trees
In this appendix, each step in the text analysis will be illustrated by a different example. The text quoted below is less clear than that analyzed in Chapter 3, and so may be of some help to readers who would like to use our text analysis approach for research purposes.The text is that of a telegram from a Dutch official in Indonesia to the minister of foreign affairs in The Hague in 1947. In order to reestablish law and order in Indonesia, in July 1947 the Dutch undertook a so-called limited police action against the self-proclaimed Indonesian government seeking independence. Since the Dutch military measures did not prove effective enough to restore law and order, The Hague was on the point of giving in to the requirements of the Security Council of the United Nations. The Security Council wanted to intervene in the independence negotiations between the Dutch and Indonesia by establishing a so-called Good Offices Committee (GOC).Telegram from the Chief of the Direction Far East to the Dutch Minister of Foreign Affairs, August 25, 1947
Par. 1: In connection with the critical situation and as head of an office belonging to your department, I would like to bring the following unsolicited points to your attention in connection with the dilemma which has arisen from the advice of the governor and the reports from Lake Success [location of the United Nations] cabled by Van Kleffens:
Par. 2: All the proposals from the Security Council would lead to the maintenance of the increasingly untenable state of affairs, both politically and economically, here in Indonesia.
Par. 3: However, in the report from Foreign Affairs which we have just received, it is said that the aim of limitation has to be the collapse of the Djocja regime or its readiness to make concessions. Limitation cannot have been an aim in itself for

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