Measuring Health-Related Quality of Life in Children and Adolescents: Implications for Research and Practice

By Dennis Drotar | Go to book overview

stature-related experiences among short, nonreferred youth is less than that observed in the PSP clinic-referred sample. The negative experiences themselves might increase the likelihood of a clinical referral being made and thereby create a spurious relationship between SS and negative psychosocial experiences. Future studies in this area should ideally contrast the adaptation of referred and nonreferred samples of youth with comparable degrees of SS. Such a research design would be exceedingly feasible considering that the statistically defined physical trait of SS (i.e., ≤ 5th percentile) is easily measured and this cutoff classifies large numbers of youth of all ages and across both genders.


ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

Portions of this work were presented at the Great Lakes Regional Conference of the Society of Pediatric Psychology, Toronto, Canada, April 25-27, 1996. This research was supported in part by grants from the Human Growth Foundation and the Genentech Foundation for Growth and Development (#95-77).

The authors wish to thank the following staff for their help in data collection and analyses of results: Limor Azizy, Christopher Barrick, Angelique Fusco, Timothy Jordan, Kassia Pryzstal, David Romanowski, and Patricia Tolsma. Dr. Susana P. Campos reviewed all the medical charts to ascertain patient diagnoses. We are particularly grateful to Drs. Margaret H. MacGillivray, Mary L. Voorhess, and Tom Mazur for their key support of the clinical service component of this study. We also acknowledge the secretarial assistance of William Tallmadge.

Finally, the work described here would not have been possible without the dedicated support of the Children's Growth Foundation of Buffalo, which has made it possible for endocrine and psychoendocrine health care staff to work collaboratively at the Children's Hospital of Buffalo in the clinical management of youth with endocrine disorders.


REFERENCES

Achenbach, T. ( 1991a). Manual for the Youth Self Report and 1991 Profile. Burlington: University of Vermont Press.

Achenbach, T. ( 1991b). Manual for the Child Behavior Checklist/4-18 and 1991 Profile. Burlington: University of Vermont Press.

Achenbach, T. M., McConaughy, S. H., & Howell, C. T. ( 1987). "Child/adolescent behavioral and emotional problems: Implications of cross-informant correlations for situational specificity". Psychological Bulletin, 101, 213-232.

Allen, D. B., & Fost, N. C. ( 1990). "Growth hormone therapy for short stature: Panacea or pandora's box"? Journal of Pediatrics, 117, 16-21.

American Psychiatric Association. ( 1994). Diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders ( 4th ed.). Washington, DC: Author.

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