Housing Policy Matters: A Global Analysis

By Shlomo Angel | Go to book overview

20
Housing Quality

The issue of the quality of housing has been the central issue in a housing policy debate that started in the industrializing European countries during the nineteenth century and continued in developing countries during the twentieth. The debate even narrowed occasionally to the question of "What constitutes a house?" or, in other words, to the question "When does a hovel, a shack, a shanty, or a plastic-and-cardboard contraption become a house?"

We already elaborated on this debate in our discussion of building codes and standards (see chapter 11). On one side of the debate stand those who believe that there is a minimum quality of housing (which they can sensibly define), below which human habitations become inhuman and can no longer be called houses. And it is indeed a short step from this position to decree such inhuman habitations invisible and nonexistent insofar as counting houses is concerned, to point to their state of disrepair and squalor as clear signs of moral degradation, and to demand their immediate removal and replacement with sturdy houses on solid foundations, houses that befit humans and are worthy of their name.

On the other side of the debate stand those who believe that houses reflect poverty; that the poor make rational decisions about how much housing they can afford to consume; that bad housing is not antisocial; and that, when people are given a stake in the houses and neighborhoods they occupy, they invest their labor and their savings in improving their houses over time. In the industrialized countries, this debate has more recently centered on issues of urban redevelopment versus rehabilitation, renewal, and conservation. In the developing countries, this debate has centered on the demolition of slums and the eviction of their dwellers versus slum upgrading and tenure regularization.

This debate is likely to be with us well into the new century, but there is no question that, as of this writing, most societies have now shied away from agreeing on a morally acceptable standard of housing and then ensuring that all their citizens are decently housed, as of right, in such standard housing. Surely, slums and squatter settlements continue to be destroyed for one reason or

-269-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Housing Policy Matters: A Global Analysis
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 426

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.