Lift Up Your Voice like a Trumpet: White Clergy and the Civil Rights and Antiwar Movements, 1954-1973

By Michael B. Friedland | Go to book overview

CHAPTER FIVE

But let judgment run down as waters, and righteousness as a mighty stream.

AMOS 5:24


Flood Tide

Bearing Witness in Alabama, 1965

If it had not exactly become de rigueur for clergy to take part in public demonstrations by 1965, the sight of men in clerical collars marching alongside civil rights activists had certainly become more commonplace. American religious bodies had thrown their support behind the civil rights movement, and it was hard to ignore the impact the "new breed" had had via the March on Washington, voter registration efforts in Mississippi, and their contribution to the passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964. Hostile laypeople continued to question their motives, but there was every reason to expect that for the rest of the decade the white churches would continue to expend their energy and funds in the struggle to end racial discrimination. 1

The high-water mark of the white clergy's support for the civil rights movement arrived in the spring of 1965, with the highly visible presence of hundreds of priests, nuns, rabbis, and ministers in the SCLC-led Selma-to-Montgomery March, and continued with the passage of the Voting Rights Act that summer. Many had arrived in Selma in March 1965 after seeing dramatic and

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Lift Up Your Voice like a Trumpet: White Clergy and the Civil Rights and Antiwar Movements, 1954-1973
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Acknowledgements ix
  • Introduction 3
  • Chapter One 18
  • Chapter Two 49
  • Chapter Three 70
  • Chpter Four 93
  • Chapter Five 113
  • Chapter Six 140
  • Chapter Seven 164
  • Chapter Eight 189
  • Chapter Nine 213
  • Epilogue 237
  • Notes 253
  • I. Manuscript Collections 287
  • Index 305
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