The Starr Evidence: Including the Complete Text of the Grand Jury Testimony of President Clinton and Monica Lewinsky

By Kenneth Starr | Go to book overview

"You let me down"; Excerpts
from evidence by and about
Monica Lewinsky

From June 1995, when she came to Washington as one of hundreds of unpaid White House interns, to the public exposure of her most intimate longings and sexual secrets, Monica S. Lewinsky has made a long and tumultuous journey. What began as an improbable crush on the president of the United States has led her, at the age of 25, to be the single most important witness in an inquiry being considered in the House of Representatives that could result in the impeachment of President Clinton.

The documents released on Monday, September 21, 1998 by the House, part of the voluminous Evidentiary record submitted by independent counsel Kenneth W. Starr, tell Lewinsky's story through more than 900 pages of love letters to the president, interrogations by FBI agents, testimony to prosecutors and the grand jury, and the perspectives of White House aides and Pentagon supervisors on her conduct.

In this untidy collection of texts, her emotional highs and lows are charted in both minute legalisms and unguarded private notes. There was joy the night Clinton first kissed her, said one prosecutor's memo. And there was threatening rage: "I am begging you one last time to please let me visit briefly Tuesday evening," she wrote Clinton after the affair had long died.

The testimony contains a remarkable session between Lewinsky

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