The Cost of Human Neglect

By Harrell R. Rodgers Jr. | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

Many people helped me directly and indirectly to write this book, and it is a pleasure to have an opportunity to express my thanks to them. A number of my departmental and professional colleagues read all or part of the book and made many constructive criticisms that are reflected in the finished work. To Norman Furniss, Howard Leichter, Richard Hofstadter, Alan Stone, and Al Watkins I owe a considerable debt. There were also several anonymous reviewers I cannot specifically thank. I hope they will see the positive fruits of their labors in this work and know that I benefited greatly from their counsel.

The numerous versions of this manuscript were typed by the University of Houston word-processing center. To the director, Sanu Lokhandwala, and her staff of able assistants I am pleased to record my thanks. To any deans or other administrators who might read this page, I would like to say that I would have been even more grateful for this service if it had been free rather than two dollars a page. On the positive side, I must say that the university's policy on book typing rather consistently keeps me in personal touch with the agony of poverty and economic hardship.

A. Joseph Hollander, the editor of this volume, did an excellent job of making my prose more lean and effective and was unusually effective in moving the text into print. I particularly appreciate his efforts to get this book on to the market while the data were fresh and the topic timely.

My greatest debt continues to be to my wife, Lynne, for her uncompromising love and richness of spirit that daily reminds me that people are inherently good and that this goodness is the best and greatest hope for all of us.

I am reminded that humanity's struggles are long but life is short by the recent tragic death of my good friend Bill White. It is with gratitude for his friendship, and anguish at its loss, that I dedicate this volume to his memory.

Harrell Rodgers
May 1982

-x-

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The Cost of Human Neglect
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • The Cost of Human Neglect *
  • Contents *
  • Introduction vii
  • Acknowledgments x
  • 1: The Errant Welfare State 3
  • 2: American Poverty 14
  • 3: American Social Welfare Programs 50
  • 4: European Social Welfare Programs 103
  • 5: The Economic Crisis in America 126
  • 6: Restructuring the American Economy 154
  • 7: Reforming America's Social Welfare Programs 185
  • 8: Conclusions 224
  • About the Author 226
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