Feminism, the Public and the Private

By Joan B. Landes | Go to book overview

Notes on Contributors

DAVID BELL teaches Cultural Studies at Staffordshire University.

SEYLA BENHABIB is Professor of Government at Harvard University and Senior Research Fellow at the Center for European Studies. She is the author of Critique, Norm and Utopia: The Normative Foundations of Critical Theory ( Columbia University Press, 1987); Situating the Self: Gender, Community and Postmodernism in Contemporary Ethics ( Routledge, 1992); The Reluctant Modernism of Hannah Arendt (Sage, 1996); and together with Judith Butler et al., Feminist Contentions: A Philosophical Exchange ( Routledge, 1995).

LAUREN BERLANT teaches English at the University of Chicago. She is author of The Anatomy of National Fantasy: Hawthorne, Utopia, and Everyday Life ( Chicago University Press, 1991) and The Queen of America Goes to Washington City: Essays on Sex and Citizenship ( Duke University Press, 1997).

JON BINNIE teaches Human Geography and Criminal Justice at Liverpool John Moores University. His research and teaching interests include the sexual politics of consumption, migration, and nationhood, and he is currently writing a book on sexual citizenship with David Bell.

WENDY BROWN is Professor of Women's Studies and Legal Studies at University of California, Santa Cruz, and Visiting Professor of Political Science at University of California, Berkeley. Her most recent book is States of Injury: Power and Freedom in Late Modernity ( Princeton University Press, 1995).

JULIA CREAM did a Ph.D. at University College London. She now works for Sense, the National Deafblind and Rubella Association, in London.

LEONORE DAVIDOFF is a Research Professor in Social History in the Sociology Department at the University of Essex. She is the Founding Editor of the journal Gender and History and co-author with Catherine Hall of Family Fortunes: Men and Women of the English Middle Class 1780-1850 ( Hutchinson and University of Chicago Press, 1987).

MARY G. DIETZ is Professor of Political Science at the University of Minnesota. She is the author of Between the Human and the Divine: ThePolitical Thought of Simone Weil

-vii-

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