Feminism, the Public and the Private

By Joan B. Landes | Go to book overview

14
All Hyped Up and No Place to Go

David Bell, Jon Binnie, Julia Cream, and Gill Valentine


PREFACE

The joint authoring of a paper can be a troublesome affair, necessitating some kind of initial 'coming clean' with regard to what went on behind the scenes; what is there between the lines. The four of us are positioned personally and politically very differently and have different levels of investment in the identities and controversies which we discuss here. Hence in the preparation and writing of this paper we adopted different, often contradictory standpoints. Rather than attempt to create an artificial coherent argument out of our 'troubles' we have tried to let the conflicts we experienced producing this paper--we might say our differences--show in order to illustrate precisely the tensions that we feel exist within theories of gender identities and the subversive potentials of 'transgressive' performances of identity in space.


INTRODUCTION: DOING GENDER, MAKING SPACE

This paper is concerned with the intersection of 'sex', 'gender', 'identity,' and 'space'; with their construction and performance, their constructedness and their performativity. The notion that places are socially constructed has become commonsense, almost banal. At the same time, the language of social relations and of identity is inherently spatial. We need no reminding that geographers are beginning to wake up to the idea that space is gendered and that

____________________
Reprinted by permission from Gender, Place and Culture, 1/ 1 ( 1994), 31-47. Copyright © Carfax Publishing Ltd ( 1994) 11 New Fetter Lane, London EC4P4EE.

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