Horace Greeley, Nineteenth-Century Crusader

By Glyndon G. Van Deusen | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 18
A Nationalist at Bay

THE STORM OVER THE UNION BEGAN TO LOWER immediately that the election was over. At the same time, a fury of contention arose concerning the spoils of office, most of all over the Cabinet. The country was thus confronted with the spectacle of two conflicts, one of ever-increasing gravity, waged over the preservation of the nation, the other, less ominous to the peace and safety of the country but nevertheless full of bitterness and hatred, fought out among the groups and cliques of Republican office‐ seekers.

Anti-Seward Republicans in New York were determined to advance their own interests the while they saved the national government from the clutches of Thurlow Weed. The more they thought about it, the more virtue they saw in pushing Horace Greeley for a place in Lincoln's inner circle. Conversations ensued, rumor took wing and speculation spread.

It was reported that the Tribune's editor wanted to be postmaster-general, the better to launch his lightnings against governmental waste and Congressional franks. His friends waxed enthusiastic. His enemies jeered. One ex-legislator, ousted by his constituents for his part in the gridiron-bill corruption, reported it as settled that Greeley was to be Secretary of the Exterior, "his principal duties to watch the thermometer and tell how cold it is out there." 1 Reformer Joshua Leavitt of the Independent wrote in alarm to Salmon P. Chase that to put Greeley in the Cabinet in any position would ruin the Administration.

Greeley professed a complete lack of interest in becoming a member of Lincoln's official family. Writing to Beman Brockway he noted, only to wave grandly aside, the possibility that he might be offered a Cabinet station. Such a move, he declared, would needlessly infuriate the South and he had no interest in the honor.

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Horace Greeley, Nineteenth-Century Crusader
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Horace Greeley - Nineteenth-Century Crusader *
  • Dorace Greeley - Nineteenth-Century Crusader *
  • Acknowledgment *
  • Contents *
  • Illustrations *
  • Dorace Greeley - Nineteenth-Century Crusader *
  • Prologue *
  • Chapter 1 - Youth of a Yankee *
  • Chapter 2 - The Slopes of Parnassus *
  • Chapter 3 - A Budding Politician *
  • Chapter 4 - A Bride and an Alliance *
  • Chapter 5 - Microcosms *
  • Chapter 6 - This Brave New World *
  • Chapter 7 - Not So Brave and Not So New *
  • Chapter 8 - Soundings *
  • Chapter 9 - The Crystallization of a "Liberal" Program *
  • Chapter 10 - A Strong-Minded Adjutant *
  • Chapter 11 - Crisis and Schism *
  • Chapter 12 - The Greeleys at Home *
  • Chapter 13 - Interlude *
  • Chapter 14 - A Disruption of Partnerships *
  • Chapter 15 - A Republican Operator *
  • Chapter 16 - Greeley's Battle *
  • Chapter 17 - A Demonstration of Independence *
  • Chapter 18 - A Nationalist at Bay *
  • Chapter 19 - Windswept *
  • Chapter 20 - Storm-Tossed *
  • Chapter 21 - "For You O Democracy" *
  • Chapter 22 - Pursuit of the Dream *
  • Chapter 23 - Valiant Battle *
  • Chapter 24 - And Still the Quest *
  • Chapter 25 - The End of the Rainbow *
  • Epilogue *
  • Bibliography *
  • Index *
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