William H. Seward's Travels around the World

By William Henry Seward; Olive Risley Seward | Go to book overview

rity for their labor or their freedom, they are hurried on board sailing-craft. These vessels are built in the United States, and they appear at Macao under the United States flag, promising to convey the emigrants to our country. So soon as they have cleared the port, they hoist the colors of Peru, San Salvador, or some other Spanish-American state. It is when this fraud is discovered that scenes of mutiny and murder occur, of which we have such frequent and frightful accounts. It shall not be our fault if, in the cause of humanity, the United States Government is not informed of this great outrage against our national honor.

Chinese versatility has a fine illustration in the Canton fisheries. On either side of our steamer, as we came down the river, was a tub or cistern holding five hundred gallons of water. The water contained great quantities of living fish produced in ponds in the vicinity of Canton. Arriving at the wharf here, a sluice was opened at the bottom of each cistern, and the fish, rushing out with the rapid current, dropped into smaller tubs, and were conveyed either to market, or to ships going to sea.

January 2d.--We are pleased with the reassurance we receive here from home, that a semi-monthly line of steamers is to be established by the Pacific Mail Steamship Company. This line is a development of enterprise which, though noiseless, is extending the American name and influence in the East.

The American houses in China are as follows:

Russell & Company, with establishments at Shanghai, Hong-Kong, Canton, Foo-Choo, Kiu-Kiang, Han-Kow, and Tien-Tsin.

Augustine Heard & Company, at Shanghai, Hong-Kong, Canton, and Foo-Choo.

Oliphant & Company, at Shanghai, Hong-Kong, Canton, and Foo-Choo.

Bull, Pardon & Company, at Shanghai, Hong-Kong, Canton, and Foo-Choo.

Smith, Archer, & Company, at Shanghai, Hong-Kong, and Canton.

Silas E. Burrows & Company, at Hong-Kong.

E. J. Sage & Company, at Hong-Kong.

H. Fogg & Company, at Shanghai.

A. C. Farnham & Company, at Shanghai.

To all these houses our grateful acknowlegments--to Russell

-276-

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