William H. Seward's Travels around the World

By William Henry Seward; Olive Risley Seward | Go to book overview

CHAPTER XI.
UMBALLA AND PUTTEEALA.

Meerut, the Scene of the Outbreak of the Great Mutiny.--Hindoo Pilgrims.--First View of the Himalayas.--Invitations to Putteeala.--Journey thither.--The City of Putteeala.--Coaches or Elephants?--Entrance into Putteeala.--A Magnificent Procession.--Our Palace.

Umballa, March 30th.--Leaving Delhi, yesterday morning, we recrossed the Jumna and its valley by a bridge and long causeway to the station of Gazeabad. Thence we made our way through a sea of golden wheat-fields, dotted with islands of blooming mangotrees--one hundred and fifty miles--to this place. We stopped at Meerut, a garrison-town, made memorable by being the scene of the outbreak of the mutiny. That great disaster left at Meerut no such painful traces or touching monuments as are seen at Cawnpore, Lucknow, and Delhi.

The common roads parallel with the railroad, for a distance of twenty miles above Meerut, were thronged with travellers, chiefly men and children, of all castes and classes--save only the poor pariahs, each troop attended by musicians, their costumes diverse in form and color. The greater number were pedestrians, but others rode the native ponies, donkeys, camels, and elephants. A few showed a special pride as they came along in gayly-decorated carts drawn by clean white oxen decked with ribbons and garlands. The long processions which Dublin sent out to Donnybrook on the days of its fair; the multitude which throngs the road from

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