Reading Nathalie Sarraute: Dialogue and Distance

By Emer O'Beirne | Go to book overview

3
THE SELF AND LANGUAGE: AUTHENTICITY AND CONVENTION

Tu ne t'aimes pas, written immediately after Enfance and published in 1989, shares with it the structure of a fragmented authorial voice engaged in internal dialogue. The authorial status of the dialoguing self is less explicit than in Enfance where the autobiographical project emphasized the identity of narrated, narrating, and writing selves; none the less, Sarraute's conversations with Simone Benmussa while Tu ne t'aimes pas was being written show her affinity to its 'nous' in terms of both the general lack of a unitary sense of self, and the particular experiences that plurality of voices describes, such as the death of its partner (see TTP122; Sarraute 1987a:151-6). With the absence of the unifying impetus inherent in more openly autobiographical writing (and which defeated, in Enfance, the attempt to undo it through a dialogic structure), comes a much more radical disintegration of the authorial voice. Instead of a binary opposition between two perspectives which could be characterized in a relatively stable manner as respectively close to childhood sensations and alienated from them, and consequently reliable and unreliable, we get in Tu ne t'aimes pas a view of the mind as composed of innumerable voices, no one of which predominates in the text. The more rigorous dispersal of speaker-authority here than in Enfance leads to a more sustained use of direct discourse to represent the utterances of 'outsiders' too, a more enduring authorial refusal to subsume the words of others into its own determinedly multiple discourses.

The absence of a defined reader-figure in Tu ne t'aimes pas also distinguishes it from Enfance (and indeed from L'Usage de la parole which immediately preceded Enfance). Not assigning the reader a clear and limiting role within the text would appear to grant him more freedom, to permit a more unconditioned response to what he reads and a more active role in the establishment of meaning than Enfance finally allowed. On the other hand, the absence of the reader from the text could simply mean that he has ceased to matter, that his

-93-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Reading Nathalie Sarraute: Dialogue and Distance
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Acknowledgements v
  • Contents vii
  • Abbreviations viii
  • Introduction 1
  • 1- Irony, Dialogue, and the Novel 10
  • 2- The Writing Self: Irony And Authority 49
  • 3- The Self and Language: Authenticity and Convention 93
  • 4- Reading and Otherness 137
  • 5- Reading in Theory and Practice 181
  • Conclusion Ici-From Language to Silence And Back 221
  • Bibliography 236
  • Index 255
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 266

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.