A History of Canada - Vol. 2

By Gustave Lanctot; Margaret M. Cameron | Go to book overview

CHAPTER SIX
FRONTENAC IN QUEBEC. JOLLIET ON THE MISSISSIPPI
POLITICAL REORGANIZATION
1672-1675

Frontenac governs without an intendant. Convocation of the different orders. The Governor makes police regulations, creates échevins, observes the conduct of the Jesuits. Fur trade and English competition. Erection of Fort Frontenac. Repression of illicit hunting. Frontenac- Fénelon-Perrot quarrel. Jolliet explores the Mississippi. The West India Company abolished. Re-establishment of the office of intendant. Reorganization of the Sovereign Council. Mgr. de Laval, titular Bishop of Quebec. Penalties imposed on coureurs de bois.

Louis de Buade Frontenac, Knight and Count of Palluau, who was chosen to succeed Courcelles, was a godson of Louis XIII and the protégé of Gaston d'Orléans, the uncle of Louis XIV. He was related through his mother to the influential Phélypeaux family, and he had married one of the "divinities" of the age, Anne de la Grange-Trianon. Madame de Frontenac did not accompany her husband to Canada, but, as a member of the Court circle she was in a position to advance her husband's interests and to defend him when the need arose. Frontenac had served with distinction in several campaigns, and had been wounded at the battle of Orbitello. According to Saint-Simon, "he was very intelligent, very much the fashionable gentleman, and completely penniless." It was partly to escape the pressing demands of his creditors that he asked, through the offices of friends, to be appointed to an obscure post in a distant colony. Energetic and imperious to the point of violence, infatuated with his position, unhampered by scruples, very much given to ostentation and endowed with a gift for the written and spoken word, such, at fifty years of age, was the man whom the Sovereign Council installed on September 12, 1672, as

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