A History of Canada - Vol. 2

By Gustave Lanctot; Margaret M. Cameron | Go to book overview

CHAPTER THIRTEEN
CONQUEST OF HUDSON BAY
AND INTERNAL QUARRELS
1697-1698

Hesitations of the Iroquois. Expedition against Boston. D'Iberville captures Hudson Bay. Disagreement between Frontenac and Champigny. Mgr. de Saint-Vallier. Mgr. de Laval. The Tartuffe incident. The Saint-Vallier-Callières quarrel and the interdiction of the Récollets. Liquor scandal. Surplus of beaver. Abolition of congés. Peace of Ryswick. Iroquois peace proposals. Death of Frontenac.

After the destruction of their villages, the hungry and humiliated Onondagas and Oneidas sought help from the English. When, in September 1696, the Governor of New York offered their envoys nothing more than blankets and iron pots, they told him that since the English did not choose to fight in their support, they would have to conclude a peace with Ononthio. 1 Accordingly, in February and again in August (1697), several delegations sought to reopen parleys with Frontenac, but he met their overtures with the same firm answer he had given before: he would receive ambassadors only if they had been instructed to accept his conditions. The Iroquois were not quite ready to submit to this ultimatum, but during the summer of 1697 they made only two minor raids, on St. Lambert and La Prairie. 2 This moderation was dictated as much by necessity as by prudence. They had to defend their own villages against Huron and Ottawa incursions, which, in the course of the spring, had cost them two hundred warriors. 3 In the West, however, Iroquois intrigues were stirring up tribal rivalries. The Sioux attacked the Miamis who in turn robbed the French. In 1697 they even captured Nicolas Perrot, who was saved from torture only by the intervention of the Outagamis. In an effort to halt the spread of disaffection Lamothe-Cadillac went down with

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