A History of Canada - Vol. 2

By Gustave Lanctot; Margaret M. Cameron | Go to book overview

CHAPTER EIGHTEEN
CAPTURE OF PORT ROYAL BY THE ENGLISH AND
CONQUEST OF NEWFOUNDLAND BY THE FRENCH
1689-1713

Franco-Abenahi hostilities. Minas ravaged by Church. His defeat at Port Royal. Destruction of Narantsouak. Domestic difficulties and quarrels. Siege and capture of Port Royal. English and French in Newfoundland. D'Iberville's victories. English attempts against Placentia. Expeditions of Subercase and Saint-Ovide. Treaty of Utrecht.

Brouillan had arrived full of new plans for Acadia, but their execution was prevented by the outbreak of the War of the Spanish Succession in May 1702. The Governor immediately proposed a neutrality pact with New England, but his offer was rejected and both the French and the English colonies were faced with possibility of invasion. Brouillan had only sixty regulars and about three hundred militiamen to defend Port Royal, but he hastened the completion of the defences, and sent envoys with presents to the Indians. 1 The English in their turn rebuilt the fort at Pemaquid which had been destroyed by d'Iberville, and the Governor of Massachusetts signed an agreement with the Abenakis. Such agreements were, however, never completely binding on the Indians, and neither they nor the French were deterred from hostile action by prudent fear of reprisals. The Abenakis allowed themselves to be won over again by the Abbé Rasles and in August 1703 they joined Beaubassin's successful expedition against Wells. The English, however, recovering quickly, drove back Beaubassin and his Indians from Saco and destroyed the habitation at Pentagoët. The following year, determined to rid their settlements of the Indian threat, the authorities sent detachments in pursuit of the Abenaki raiders and offered a bounty of forty pounds sterling for a scalp,

-180-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
A History of Canada - Vol. 2
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 289

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.